Mini-Courses

If you would like to be able to assign this content to learners and track their progress, you can request a login for RHEcourse, our free online platform for SRH education, which offers additional features for users who want to engage more deeply.

If you are a learner who would like to enroll in these courses for self-paced learning, you can request a RHEcourse login for self-paced learning.

IERH acknowledges the importance of inclusive language as a component of patient-centered care and we are working to improve our content. Read more here

Abortion 101

Abortion is a common experience for people around the world; yet it is often excluded from the curricula of health professionals. Our aim is to fill in the gaps left by the exclusion of abortion from mainstream curricula.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the difference between medication abortion and emergency contraception
  • Recognize that medication abortion and uterine aspiration are safe and highly acceptable to patients
  • Describe how medication abortion works
  • Understand why people seek abortion care later in pregnancy
  • Describe general factors associated with abortion pain and options for pain control
  • Understand the basics of how uterine aspiration, induction termination, and D&E are performed

EXPLAINED: Abortion Safety in the United States Lecture

Dr. Dan Grossman, of the University of California San Francisco, explains the most up-to-date research on abortion safety in the United States.

Download the EXPLAINED: Abortion Safety Facilitator Guide with Quiz.

Don’t have time for the full lecture? Watch the short series version and view the infographic.

 

The following links provided the research used in this video:

Grimes DA, et al. (2006). “Unsafe abortion: the preventable pandemic.
Texas Policy Evaluation Project: Research Brief. (2016). “Change in number of physicians providing abortion care in Texas after HB2.

Medication Abortion

Presented by: Lealah Pollock MD, MS

Family and Community Medicine
University of California, San Francisco

Click here to download this video lecture  and here to download the lesson plan/facilitator guide with quiz.

 

Citations

  • Teal, et al. Contraception. 2007
  • Guttmacher Institute – State Laws & Policies
  • Johnson JE. J Pers Soc Psychol, 1973
  • Davis A. et al. JAMWA, 2000

Uterine Aspiration Abortion

Presented by: Sanithia L. Williams, MD
University of California, San Francisco

Click here to download this video lecture and here to download the lesson plan/facilitator guide with quiz.

Citations

Pain with Uterine Aspiration Abortion

Video Lecture Presented by:

University of California San Francisco
Click here to download this video lecture 

Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Pain with Uterine Aspiration Abortion Slide Set

Week3-Pain (Meckstroth)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Karen Meckstroth, MD, MPH
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Pain with Uterine Aspiration Abortion (pdf)

Abortion After the First Trimester

Video Lecture Presented by:

University of California, San Francisco

Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Abortion After the First Trimester Slide Set

Week4-After1stTri (Drey)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Eleanor Drey, MD, EdM
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Abortion After the First Trimester (pdf)

Contraception

Clinicians can support patient autonomy and reproductive justice by using shared decision making to assist  patients choose a contraceptive method that is the best fit for their preferences, lifestyle and reproductive goals and having the skills and knowledge to provide patients with the full range of contraceptive options.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how to counsel patients for contraception using shared decision making
  • Discuss the benefits, efficacy, and side effects of each contraceptive method
  • Describe which methods can be used for emergency contraception
  • Choose a method of emergency contraception that best meets the needs of each patient
  • Determine which forms of EC are most effective depending on patient preferences and BMI

Contraception 101

Presented by: Michalle Ramirez-McLaughlin, RN, MS, FNP-BC
University of California, San Francisco

Click here to download this video lecture and here to download the lesson plan/facilitator guide with quiz.

Citation

Prescribing Emergency Contraception

Presented by: Shokoufeh Dianat, DO
University of California, San Francisco

Click here to download this video lecture  and here to download the facilitator guide with quiz.

Click here to download the EC Decision Tree used in this video

Citation

Haeger et al. 2018; Glasier et al. 2011; Edelman et al. 2018; Kapp et al. 2015

This is How I Teach: SDM with LARC Methods

Presented by:

Christine Dehlendorf, MD, MAS
University of California, San Francisco

This is How I Teach: No Touch Technique for Copper IUD

Presented by Suzan Goodman MD, MPH
National Training Director, Bixby Beyond the Pill Program
Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF

Professional Responsibility

Research shows that clinical learners exhibit a decline in empathy after they begin interacting with patients which poses a threat to their ability to provide patient-centered care. Patient-centered care challenges doctors to be empathetic, respectful, and compassionate, even during difficult patient interactions or when they have moral objections to the patient’s health behaviors.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the professional responsibilities of health-care providers caring for people seeking abortion
  • Recognize and appreciate appropriate and inappropriate applications of “conscience” in the setting of abortion care
  • Practice patient communication skills
  • Identify steps to take to enhance professionalism in personally challenging clinical encounter

EXPLAINED: Turnaway Study Lecture

Dr. Diana Greene Foster, of the University of California San Francisco, explains the most up-to-date research from the Turnaway Study.

Download the EXPLAINED: The Turnaway Study Video Companion Guide.

Don’t have time for the full lecture? Watch the short series version and view the infographic.

 

The following links provided the research used in this video:

Roberts SCM, Gould H, Kimport K, Weitz TA, Foster DG. Out-of-Pocket Costs and Insurance Coverage for Abortion in the United States. March 2014. Women’s Health Issues, (24)2:3211-218.
Biggs MA, Gould H, Foster DG. Understanding why women seek abortions in the US. July 2013. BMC Women’s Health, 13:29.
Foster DG, Gerdts C, Korenman S, Ralph L, Roberts SCM. Effect of being denied a wanted abortion on women’s socioeconomic wellbeing. APHA abstract. https://apha.confex.com/apha/144am/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/357932
Foster DG, Raifman S, Biggs MA. Effect of abortion receipt and denial on women’s existing and subsequent children. APHA abstract. https://apha.confex.com/apha/144am/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/357832
For more information, review the annotated bibliography.

Physicians’ Professional Responsibilities in Abortion Care

Video Lecture Presented by:

Jody Steinauer, MD, MAS
University of California, San Francisco

Click here to download this video lecture

Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Physicians’ Professional Responsibilities in Abortion Care Slide Set

Week2-Responsibilities (Steinauer)

 

Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Jody Steinauer, MD, MAS
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Physicians’ Professional Responsibilities in Abortion Care (pdf)

Nursing Roles in Abortion Care

Video Lecture Presented by:

Amy Levi, PhD, CNM, WHNP-BC

University of New Mexico
Click here to download this video lecture

Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Nursing Roles in Abortion Care: Clinical Responsibility and Professional Ethics Slide Set

Week2-Nursing (Levi)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Amy Levi, PhD, CNM, WHNP-BC
Albers Professor of Midwifery
University of New Mexico

Click to download Nursing Roles in Abortion Care: Clinical Responsibility and Professional Ethics (pdf)

 

Conscientious Provision and Refusal of Abortion Care

Video Lecture Presented by:

University of California, San Francisco
Click here to download this video lecture 

Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Conscientious Provision and Refusal of Abortion Care Slide Set

Week2-Refusal (Freedman)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Lori Freedman, PhD
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Conscientious Provision and Refusal of Abortion Care Slide Set (pdf) 

 

Abortion in the Primary Care Setting

Video Lecture Presented by:

University of California, San Francisco
Click here to download this video lecture

Abortion in the Primary Care Setting Slide Set

Week5-Primary (Dehlendorf)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Christine Dehlendof, MD, MAS
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Abortion in the Primary Care Setting (pdf)

Medical Student Professional Responsibility

This web-based Medical Student Professional Responsibility Module is intended to help learners develop skills to manage their own judgmental feelings in patient interactions by encouraging empathy, compassion, or acceptance. This exercise was developed as a values clarification exercise for use with medical students. The Digital Interactive Family Planning Module is designed for individual use on smartphones, tablets, and computers. This module can complement a group setting or be used as a stand-alone tool.

RHAP Birth Control Across the Gender Spectrum

contraception across the gender spectrum

This resource explains different birth control methods for people across the gender spectrum, with a focus on the effects of different forms of birth control on those taking gender-affirming hormones such as testosterone.

Find this resource here!

Structures & Self: Advancing Equity and Justice in Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

As we face these times of fear and uncertainty it is especially important that we combat misinformation and challenge racist, nationalistic rhetoric and narratives within our communities, our healthcare systems, and ourselves. Understanding our own implicit biases and having a clear understanding of how social, political, and economic structures impact health are important in addressing inequity and ensuring that the healthcare setting is equipped to provide safe and compassionate care. Find the visual glossary for this course here!

Learning Objectives

  • Learners will become familiar with historical context and implications for disparities in sexual and reproductive health. This video will review how the history of oppression, contributes to current health inequities.
  • Learners will explore how the structures of power and oppression manifest within healthcare systems and impact sexual and reproductive health outcomes.
  • Learners will identify implicit bias, privilege, and fragility regarding patient interactions, their relationship to structures of oppression, and practices for self-reflection and self-care.
  • After learners have recognized their privilege, they will identify ways to center a justice framework and structural analysis as a tool to promote optimal health outcomes.

Own Our Legacy

Structures & Self is a learner-led, justice-informed curriculum designed to teach learners to consider how systems of power and legacies of oppression impact their care for patients.

Resources

Medical Apartheid

Medical Bondage

Anarcha and the Mothers of Modern Gynecology

Racial bias in pain assessment and treatment recommendations, and false beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites

HRD-77-3 Investigation of Allegations Concerning Indian Health Service

Forced Sterilization of Native Americans: Later Twentieth Century Physician Cooperation with National Eugenic Policies?

California was sterilizing its female prisoners as late as 2010

Disproportionate Sterilization of Latinos Under California’s Eugenic Sterilization Program, 1920–1945

Killing the Black Body

How False Beliefs in Physical Racial Difference Still Live in Medicine Today – The New York Times

Citations

Prevalence of HIV and healthcare experiences among people of transgender experience

Recognize Structures of Oppression

Resources

Healthy People 2020

Structural Competency 

Citations

Racial residential segregation is associated with higher rates of preterm birth for Black women

Physicians spend less time with clinically obese patients and fail to refer them for diagnostic tests compared to thinner patients.

  • Phelan SM, Burgess DJ, Yeazel MW, Hellerstedt WL, Griffin JM, van Ryn M. Impact of weight bias and stigma on quality of care and outcomes for patients with obesity. Obes Rev. 2015 Apr;16(4):319-26. doi: 10.1111/obr.12266. Epub 2015 Mar 5. PubMed PMID: 25752756; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4381543.

Check Yourself

Resources

Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” by Peggy McIntosh

Implicit Bias Test

Citations

Implicit bias among providers

  • FitzGerald C, Hurst S. Implicit bias in healthcare professionals: a systematic review. BMC Med Ethics. 2017 Mar 1;18(1):19. doi: 10.1186/s12910-017-0179-8. PubMed PMID: 28249596; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5333436.

Racial bias in pain assessment and treatment recommendations

  • Smedley BD, Stith AY, Nelson AR. Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. National Academies Press; Washington, DC: 2013.
  • Cleeland CS, Gonin R, Baez L, Loehrer P, Pandya KJ. Pain and treatment of pain in minority patients with cancer. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Minority Outpatient Pain Study. Ann Intern Med. 1997;127(9):813–816.
  • Goyal MK, Kuppermann N, Cleary SD, Teach SJ, Chamberlain JM. Racial disparities in pain management of children with appendicitis in emergency departments. JAMA Pediatr. 2015;169(11):996–1002.
  • Hoffman KM, Trawalter S, Axt JR, Oliver MN. Racial bias in pain assessment and treatment recommendations, and false beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Apr 19;113(16):4296-301. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1516047113. Epub 2016 Apr 4. PubMed PMID: 27044069; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4843483.

Reproductive Justice 101 Webinar

Co-hosted by SisterSong and RHEDI, this webinar will provide: an introduction to the Reproductive Justice framework and its core principles; a brief history of reproductive oppression; and a deeper understanding of intersectionality.

Click here for more community education resources from RHEDI!

The Framework: Counseling for Patient-Centered Abortion Care

Abortion is essential healthcare. As we navigate a new reality with COVID-19, we must continue to prioritize patient autonomy and recognize patients as experts in their own lives. This intentional approach requires the provision of care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and empowers people to take charge of their own health.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize areas in your practice where you may experience a judgmental reaction to patient statements, questions and decisions.
  • Apply conversational techniques for maintaining a positive relationship with patients who make decisions about health care with which you may disagree.
  • Compare and contrast different words and phrases that are used in options counseling.
  • Analyze alternative responses to patient statements.
  • Practice techniques for talking with patients about their pregnancy decisions

Decision Counseling for Positive Pregnancy Test Results

Video Lecture Presented by:
Alissa Perrucci, PhD, MPH
San Francisco General Hospital, Women’s Options Center
Click here to download this video lecture 
Lecture can be viewed with subtitles in Spanish or French. French translation was made possible by the Safe Abortion Action Fund and International Planned Parenthood Federation. Click the Closed Captions button on video lectures to access subtitles. 

Decision Counseling for Positive Pregnancy Test Results

Week2-Counseling (Perrucci)


Slide Set from Video Lecture Presented by:

Alissa Perrucci, PhD
University of California, San Francisco

Click to download Decision Counseling for Positive Pregnancy Test Results (pdf)

The Framework: The Patient Has the Answer

The Patient has the Answer Summary: Only the patient is the expert in their life and needs.

The Framework: Liberation

Liberation summary: Healthcare providers may have bias favoring a particular decision, but the patient owns the decision and ultimately it does not impact the providers life.

The Framework: Not A Failure

Not a Failure Summary:

  • A patient who returns for a second or greater abortion indicates that the clinic and staff provided high-quality service and supported the patient.
  • Viewing repeat patients as “failures” contributes to abortion shame and stigma.

The Framework: The Approach

The Approach Summary :

  • Patient-centered counseling uses this approach: Listen, don’t assume, self-reflect.
  • Patients and providers may not share understanding of complex medical terms.